Ocean Observation News | POGO

Ocean Observation News

Registration Open for Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE

The XPRIZE Foundation, the leading non-profit that’s solving the world’s Grand Challenges through large-scale incentivized prize competitions, is collaborating with ocean philanthropist Wendy Schmidt to offer $2 million dollars in prizes to address ocean acidification through the development of breakthrough pH sensor technology. The winning pH sensor(s) of the Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE will be radically more accurate, durable, and affordable to spur global research and industries in ocean services and to address ocean acidification. 

SOOS-CliC-WMO PSTG online survey

This joint initiative of Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS), Climate and the Cryosphere (CliC), and World Meteorological Organization Polar Space Task Group (WMO PSTG) aims to identify the satellite data requirements for the Southern Ocean (across all temporal/spatial scales) and to compile this information into a community report of Southern Ocean satellite data requirements.

Ocean Acidification robs reef fish of their fear of predators

Research on the behaviour of coral reef fish at naturally-occurring carbon dioxide seeps in Milne Bay in eastern Papua New Guinea has shown that continuous exposure to increased levels of carbon dioxide dramatically alters the way fish respond to predators.

 

This finding from a collaboration among scientists from the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), James Cook University and the Georgia Institute of Technology is particularly concerning not just for conservationists but for fisheries around the world and other industries dependent on the survival of fish species.

Seeking nominations for OCB Ocean Time-Series Advisory Committee

OCB are currently seeking nominations for the OCB Ocean Time-Series Advisory Committee. This subcommittee was established by the OCB SSC in 2007 to facilitate OCB community input to future ocean observing initiatives and activities; ensure that existing ocean time-series and observing systems are meeting community needs; and to keep the OCB community integrated with ongoing international ocean observing activities.

Study Tests Theory that Life Originated at Deep Sea Vents

One of the greatest mysteries facing humans is how life originated on Earth. Scientists have determined approximately when life began (roughly 3.8 billion years ago), but there is still intense debate about exactly how life began. One possibility has grown in popularity in the last two decades - that simple metabolic reactions emerged near ancient seafloor hot springs, enabling the leap from a non-living to a living world.

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