Welcome to POGO

Welcome

POGO: Taking the Pulse of the Global Ocean

  

For more than a decade, the Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans, POGO, has served as a forum for leaders of major oceanographic institutions around the world to promote global oceanography, particularly the implementation of international and integrated global ocean observing systems. POGO is an international network of collaborators who foster partnerships that advance efficiency and effectiveness in studying and monitoring the world’s oceans on a global scale. Through its efforts, POGO has promoted observations underpinning ocean and climate science, interpreted scientific results for decision makers, provided training and technology transfer to emerging economies, and built awareness of the many challenges still ahead.

 

Executive CommitteeMembers - News & Information Group - POGO Secretariat 


Ocean Observation News

 

 

International Indian Ocean Expedition 2 - Call for Expressions of Interest for Participation

The first expedition of IIOE-2, is to be flagged off from the port of Goa, India on 4 December 2015 on board ORV Sagar Nidhi at the concluding session of the International Symposium on "Dynamics of the Indian Ocean: Perspective and Retrospective" to be held in Goa during 30 November - 4 December 2015.

 

Oceans 2015 Reports: Climate Change Impacts on the Ocean

Two reports of the Oceans 2015 Initiative are now available. These reports summarize the key findings of the Fifth IPCC Assessment Report (AR5) and bring in newer literature to assess the impacts of ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation, and sea level rise, linking ocean physics and chemistry to biological processes and ecosystem functions (Part I), and ecosystem services and ocean-related human activities (Part II).

 

Can carbon dioxide be stored safely offshore?

Research Project ECO2 presents approach for a sound environmental risk assessment of sub-seabed CO2 storage

Investigation begins into Europe’s flat-lining aquaculture industry

As Europe’s reliance on seafood imports increases, a team of marine scientists has embarked on a three-year project to investigate why the continent’s own aquaculture industry is flat-lining, while countries outside the European Union (EU) enjoy boom time in the sector.

 

Pages

Newsletter

 

Read the current and previous issues of POGO's newsletter

Newsflash

 

 

POGO-17  
 

Next year's annual meeting, POGO-17 will take place from 26-28 January 2016 and will be hosted by JAMSTEC, Japan.

 

Quote

“The biggest challenge is how to manage the oceans given that most of the world's population will be using and living next to an ocean in the next 50 years or so. We have to use our oceans in a sustainable manner, and that means first they have to be observed properly. We can't just use an ocean to decimation, without realizing what is happening. The challenge is to develop capacity and knowledge and establish where we should be observing our oceans.

One of the most important things is having consistent long-term observation. We need to link up old observations and monitor the changes in things like currents and hydrography in these areas, to investigate if the observations are related to a real trend or shift or just an anomaly in the system. POGO members are endeavouring to link all the long-term data sets in the world so that the data can be accessed more readily.”

 

 

Prof. Karen Wiltshire, POGO Chair, 2015-2016

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