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Welcome to POGO

POGO: Taking the Pulse of the Global Ocean

For more than a decade, the Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans, POGO, has served as a forum for leaders of major oceanographic institutions around the world to promote global oceanography, particularly the implementation of international and integrated global ocean observing systems. POGO is an international network of collaborators who foster partnerships that advance efficiency and effectiveness in studying and monitoring the world’s oceans on a global scale. Through its efforts, POGO has promoted observations underpinning ocean and climate science, interpreted scientific results for decision makers, provided training and technology transfer to emerging economies, and built awareness of the many challenges still ahead.


Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans is a charitable incorporated organisation registered and regulated by the Charity Commission of England and Wales, No 1171692


Executive CommitteeMembers - News & Information Group - POGO Secretariat

Ocean Observation News



Fast-sinking jellyfish could boost the oceans’ uptake of carbon dioxide

Experiments show high sinking speed for dead gelatinous plankton species


How much more carbon dioxide (CO2) will the oceans be able to take up? To find out more about the efficiency of this service, scientists estimate the sinking velocities of organisms involved in the biological pump. Increasing numbers of gelatinous plankton might help in mitigating the CO2 problem. In field and laboratory experiments scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has shown that dead jellyfish and pelagic tunicates sink much faster than phytoplankton and marine snow remains. Jellies are especially important because they rapidly consume plankton and particles and quickly export biomass and carbon to the ocean interior.


EU, US, Canada launch Atlantic Ocean research alliance

24/05/2013 - EU, US, Canada launch Atlantic Ocean research alliance The European Union, the United States and Canada today agreed to join forces on Atlantic Ocean research. The agreement focuses on aligning the ocean observation efforts of the three partners. The goals are to better understand the Atlantic Ocean and to promote the sustainable management of its resources.
The work will also study the interplay of the Atlantic Ocean with the Arctic Ocean, particularly with regards to climate change. The EU and its Member States alone invest nearly two billion euro on marine and maritime research each year. The 'Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation' was signed today at a high level conference at the Irish Marine Institute in Galway. The Prime Minister of Ireland, Taoiseach Enda Kenny, attended the event (MEMO/13/455).

New Center Targets Ocean Contaminants and Human Health

Scripps scientists lead two separate projects to track potentially toxic chemicals in marine life and their impacts on human health


Capitalizing on UC San Diego's unique ability to address environmental threats to public health, a new center based at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego will target emerging contaminants found naturally in common seafood dishes as well as man-made chemicals that accumulate in human breast milk.


Postdoc Positions in Biological Oceanography/Marine Biogeochemistry, Sidney (UTS)

The University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) is seeking to employ two post-doctoral research fellows to undertake research in benthic community metabolism (eddy correlation) and biological oceanography / marine biogeochemistry. The former is a 3 year position, and the latter a 2 year position, both based in Sydney, Australia.


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Read the current and previous issues of POGO's newsletter



POGO-SCOR Visiting Fellowships 2018 now open for applications


For more information and details on how to apply please see: http://ocean-partners.org/pogo-scor-fellowship


All applications should be made via the marinetraining.eu website before 9 April 2018.



“The biggest challenge is how to manage the oceans given that most of the world's population will be using and living next to an ocean in the next 50 years or so. We have to use our oceans in a sustainable manner, and that means first they have to be observed properly. We can't just use an ocean to decimation, without realizing what is happening. The challenge is to develop capacity and knowledge and establish where we should be observing our oceans.

One of the most important things is having consistent long-term observation. We need to link up old observations and monitor the changes in things like currents and hydrography in these areas, to investigate if the observations are related to a real trend or shift or just an anomaly in the system. POGO members are endeavouring to link all the long-term data sets in the world so that the data can be accessed more readily.”



Prof. Karen Wiltshire, POGO Chair, 2015-2018

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Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans is a charitable incorporated organisation registered and regulated by the Charity Commission of England and Wales, No 1171692