Welcome to POGO | POGO

Welcome to POGO

POGO: Taking the Pulse of the Global Ocean

For more than a decade, the Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans, POGO, has served as a forum for leaders of major oceanographic institutions around the world to promote global oceanography, particularly the implementation of international and integrated global ocean observing systems. POGO is an international network of collaborators who foster partnerships that advance efficiency and effectiveness in studying and monitoring the world’s oceans on a global scale. Through its efforts, POGO has promoted observations underpinning ocean and climate science, interpreted scientific results for decision makers, provided training and technology transfer to emerging economies, and built awareness of the many challenges still ahead.

 

Executive CommitteeMembers - News & Information Group - POGO Secretariat


Ocean Observation News

 

 

Postdoctoral position in ocean acoustics at the University of Liège (Belgium)

 

The research project aims to contribute to the sustainable development and noise reduction of activities related to offshore wind parks in Europe.

Navy Deploys Scripps Global Drifter Buoys

Sailors from the office of Naval Meteorology and Oceanography released ten global drifter buoys belonging to Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego from the amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52), May 28, during Pacific Partnership 2013.
 
The drifters measure ocean currents at a depth of 15 meters (49 feet) in depth, sea surface temperatures and atmospheric pressure. All are important elements in creating an observation network, allowing for more accurate current and weather forecasts.
 

The North Pacific Research Board launches a new Long-Term Monitoring Program

The North Pacific Research Board is pleased to announce the launch of a new Long-Term Monitoring Program aimed at supporting new or existing time-series research that will enhance our ability to understand the current state of the marine ecosystem and support efforts to predict future ecosystem states in response to changing ocean conditions.

Fast-sinking jellyfish could boost the oceans’ uptake of carbon dioxide

Experiments show high sinking speed for dead gelatinous plankton species

 

How much more carbon dioxide (CO2) will the oceans be able to take up? To find out more about the efficiency of this service, scientists estimate the sinking velocities of organisms involved in the biological pump. Increasing numbers of gelatinous plankton might help in mitigating the CO2 problem. In field and laboratory experiments scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has shown that dead jellyfish and pelagic tunicates sink much faster than phytoplankton and marine snow remains. Jellies are especially important because they rapidly consume plankton and particles and quickly export biomass and carbon to the ocean interior.

 

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Newsletter

 

Read the current and previous issues of POGO's newsletter

Newsflash

 

POGO-19  

The next annual meeting (POGO-19) will take place from 23-25 January 2018 and will be hosted by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA.

 

Side meetings for the Executive and Finance Committees will take place on 22 and 26 January 2018

 

The POGO Strategy Document can be downloaded here

Quote

 

“The biggest challenge is how to manage the oceans given that most of the world's population will be using and living next to an ocean in the next 50 years or so. We have to use our oceans in a sustainable manner, and that means first they have to be observed properly. We can't just use an ocean to decimation, without realizing what is happening. The challenge is to develop capacity and knowledge and establish where we should be observing our oceans.

One of the most important things is having consistent long-term observation. We need to link up old observations and monitor the changes in things like currents and hydrography in these areas, to investigate if the observations are related to a real trend or shift or just an anomaly in the system. POGO members are endeavouring to link all the long-term data sets in the world so that the data can be accessed more readily.”

 

 

Prof. Karen Wiltshire, POGO Chair, 2015-2016

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